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People

Cassandra Calderella

Cassandra Calderella
Ph.D. Candidate, CCNY (currently a Cohort - III Ph.D student at UMBC. see Cohort - III for her new profile)

Address:

The City University of New York
160 Convent Avenue-Room 183
New York, NY 10031


Cohort 1 Theme 3: Water Prediction & Ecosystem Services Project 1: Hydrologic extremes – A systematic risk assessment of droughts and floods using in-situ and remote sensing products Task 3: Development of models for weather and ocean forecasting-, and hazard mitigation

Advisors: Tarendra Lakhankar & Reza Khanbilvardi NOAA Mentor: Xiwu Zhan (NESDIS/STAR) Expected Graduation: May 2020 Degree: Civil Engineering

Research Title: Water Prediction Technologies

Research Synopsis: Despite developing technologies or in-situ soil measurements and increased availability of remotely sensed soil moisture data, scaling differences between soil moisture observations and the proper linkage of soil moisture estimates across different scales of observations and model predictions remain important areas of research for the calibration and validation of current and upcoming space-borne surface soil moisture retrievals, as well as successful application of data assimilation techniques.

One of the first steps that needs to be taken before considering this is validation, which helps to determine how well the satellites in question are performing. One such instrument is GCOM-W1’s AMSR2, both of which measure soil moisture and are compared to in situ data taken from ground sites in Puerto Rico (NRCS SCAN Network).

Despite developing technologies or in-situ soil measurements and increased availability of remotely sensed soil moisture data, scaling differences between soil moisture observations and the proper linkage of soil moisture estimates across different scales of observations and model predictions remain important areas of research for the calibration and validation of current and upcoming space-borne surface soil moisture retrievals, as well as successful application of data assimilation techniques.

One of the first steps that needs to be taken before considering this is validation, which helps to determine how well the satellites in question are performing. One such instrument is GCOM-W1’s AMSR2, both of which measure soil moisture and are compared to in situ data taken from ground sites in Puerto Rico (NRCS SCAN Network).